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Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

MAJORITY OF DVT’S DEVELOP 5-10 DAYS FOLLOWING SURGERY. ARE YOU PREPARED?

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot, usually in a vein in the lower leg, that can cause severe breathing problems or death if it travels to your lungs.

Need for Prevention at Home
Many factors determine your risk for DVT, but studies show you’re at highest risk five to 10 days after surgery.2 With today’s shorter hospital stays, that’s most likely when you’re recovering at home, away from the watchful eye of your health care providers. Therefore, it’s vital that life-saving DVT prevention doesn’t end at the time of discharge after surgery — but continues at home throughout your most vulnerable days. Your physician can prescribe DVT prevention that you can use at home, including both mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis.

Deep Vein Thrombosis Prevalence

DVT prevalence is much higher than the average person may believe.

  • More than 50% of all hospitalized patients are at risk of DVT
  • More people die from blood clotting complications annually than breast cancer, HIV, AIDS and road traffic accidents combined
  • Venous thromboembolisum (VTE) is the second most common medical complication in acute care
  • 10% of patients with high bleeding risk who are not anti-coagulated, could have been offered safe protection against DVT with the Venowave VW5 or other mechanical prophylaxis device.

Risk Factors for Developing Deep Vein Thrombosis

  • Prolonged sitting
  • Surgery (Neurosurgery, orthopaedic, Gynaecological and gastrointestinal surgeries)
  • Hospitalization
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Pregnancy
  • Injury to the leg (with or without surgery/casting)
  • Airplane flights (>4hrs)
  • Medications (estrogen)

Traditional Treatments for Deep Vein Thrombosis Prevention

  • Graduated compression stockings
  • Anti-coagulants
  • Pneumatic Compression Device

Warning Signs

Signs of DVT

  • Pain or tenderness in an extremity of groin
  • Sudden swelling of the leg
  • Noticeably warm skin
  • Change in the color of the leg

Signs of Related Pulmonary Embolism (PE)

  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain while breathing
  • Rapid pulse
  • Coughing with blood
  • Unexplained anxiety
  • Sweating

If you suspect you have DVT, call your surgeon or healthcare provider immediately. If you suspect you have a PE, call 911 or have someone take you to an emergency room.

Mechanical Vs. Pharmacological

Your physician can prescribe prophylaxis — a preventive action taken against DVT — in different ways. Mechanical prophylaxis uses intermittent compression on the lower legs to stimulate blood flow and prevent DVT. It is safe and effective, with no side effects.3 In addition, Compression Solutions has made this type of treatment easy for patients to use at home, with our compact and portable Triple Play VT®.

Pharmacological prophylaxis works to prevent DVT through anticoagulant medicines. Though effective, these can cause adverse side effects such as the risk of bleeding complications. Several studies show positive results from using both mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis to prevent DVT. In fact, combining compression therapy with medications cuts DVT risk by 75%.4

"In about 25% of people who experience a PE, the first “symptom” is sudden death."

"RX MEDS + COMPRESSION TREAMENT CYTS DVT RISK BY 75%"

"MORE AMERICANS DIE FROM DVT THAN BREAST CANCER, AIDS and TRAFFIC FATALITIES COMBINED."

"DVT is the most common cause for hospital readmission after hip replacement."

"DVT peaks on the fifth postoperative day, and the vulnerability to DVT appears to last for three months."

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